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HOT ADTECH NEWS

Pinterest

The photo sharing social network follows industry trend

Following Instagram and Snapchat’s decisions to allow Ads on their platforms, Pinterest too is opening up to advertising. Within B2C marketing, brands have realised the potential for high returns on social networking platforms where aesthetic is everything. Like Instagram, Pinterest is full of immersive content. If advertisers master their engagement well, there are opportunities for them to increase conversions. Some ad buyers are sceptical however, given that Pinterest’s technology is relatively limited compared to its competitors. Instagram, for example, is able to use parent company, Facebook’s technology. Pinterest has been noted as a strong alternative to search advertising, as users are able to upload, collect and bookmark what interests them. This offers a lot of potential for advertisers, as Pinterest now allows marketers to collect data concerning its users. Technology providers have already swooped in to make sense of Pinterest users and how they respond to products. This in turn will help advertisers to serve their ads based on the collection of user’s interests and aspirations. With the rise of AdBlock, publishers such as Pinterest are looking to generate revenue from native advertising - that is, advertisements that are embedded in the support, which users cannot block.

 

City AM

Adblock and the confidence crisis of advertisers

 

With AdBlocker posing a serious threat to publisher’s revenues, the Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB) has launched a LEAN ads program with clear guidelines for advertisers on what ads are likely to push people to install ad blockers in the first place. City AM has taken serious measures to convince readers that they benefit from seeing ads. They are not alone in this approach to offset losses in revenue due to a lack of advertiser’s confidence. Most publishers are simply reminding their audiences that by blocking ads they may damage the content they want to see, and that they may even have to subscribe online in order to keep publications going. City AM’s digital director Martin Ashplant had two striking facts in order to justify the paper’s decision: the first that around 20% of its 1.2 million monthly browsers are using ad blocking software. Second that ad blocking is set to cost publishers in excess of $40bn by the end of 2016 according to a report from Adobe and anti-ad blocking firm PageFair. This continues the ongoing discussion concerning AdBlock in that advertisers, publishers and technologists need to work together in order for audiences to accept online ads.

 

Smart TV

 

American brands should be using programmatic to transform the way they advertise on TV.

 

What with the imminent boom in Smart TV, it may be wise for brands to use their new foray into programmatic buying as a foundation to advertise more intelligently on TV.  American brands are diverting their ad spend away from conventional television advertising, moving towards digital video. To help them make this transition, they are relying on programmatic buying strategies. 91% of brands and agencies in the US are now buying video programmatically. It is of course a welcome trend that brands are pumping more into digital video and programmatic buying. After all, by “following their consumers online”, they are reaching their desired audience more effectively. However, the danger is that this is done at the expense of traditional TV advertising. (While digital video ad spend is steadily increasing, TV ad spend is beginning to stagnate.) Instead of cutting out traditional TV advertising altogether, they should be using programmatic to transform the way they advertise on TV. Even in the UK, Sky News launching its own programmatic service to sell ads on every platform, even Smart TV.

 

Apple

After its 2 recent scandals, does Apple need to step up its data privacy policy?

Apple had to pull 256 apps from its App store when it discovered that these apps were illegally collecting personal data from iPhone owners, such as serial numbers and e-mail addresses. This latest piece of news follows hot on the heels of last week’s scandal, which saw Apple pulling several apps that could spy on encrypted traffic. People are concerned, as well they should be. With the world going digital, there is an explosion of data. At the same time, with so many consumers going mobile, businesses are finding it hard to track their online behaviour, with cookies quickly becoming obsolete. This has encouraged bad behaviour among businesses, which are resorting to underhand tactics such as spying on consumers. What we can learn from this is that it is crucial to work with businesses who operate with a stringent data privacy policy.

 

 

10 days until Web Summit! See you there!

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WEB SUMMIT, THEIR STORY

We all know the Web Summit to be one of the most prestigious gatherings of startups in the global technology ecosystem. However, what few people realise is that it had its own humble beginnings as a startup just 5 years ago. Web Summit started with just 400 attendees in Dublin. In just 4 short years, 22,000 people from more than 100 countries were in attendance. Evidently, people seemed to like what they were doing.

Web Summit was born out of the founder’s desire to find a new way to conduct conferences that were catered to startups and giving them exposure. Instead of allowing the large companies to dominate the main stage, Web Summit would ensure that small companies were not neglected.

 

According to the founder of Web Summit, Paddy Cosgrave, one of the key differences in how the event was organised was through the hiring of engineers and data specialists, as opposed to event managers as in days gone by. They found that this improved the efficiency of the process significantly. It might seem surprising that something as inherently social as a human gathering could rely so heavily on data. However, again this demonstrates the sheer power of data and just how prevalent it is today.

 

We don’t always get it right and when we look at what we have done in the past, we sometimes wince. But we care about getting it right and about giving startups the best experience we can - Paddy Cosgrave, founder of Web Summit

 

 

Despite the success of the summit, the Web Summit is committed to constantly improving the experience of startups. The Web Summit is a premium event, and they are extremely discerning in who they eventually invite to the event, having turned down more than 1,000 startups that have communicated with them in the last month alone!

 

 

Here at The Media Trader, we are proud to be a start up, dedicated to digital disruption. It is an honour to have been acknowledged by Web Summit as one of the 50 most promising startups in the world. We started with a great idea - using programmatic and RTB, enhanced with data, to make digital advertising more efficient and transparent. But this is just the beginning. We believe that the more we build our product offering and client base, the more established companies in this industry will start to take notice. 

 

 

12 days until the Web Summit! See you there!

 

 

 

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